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Projects that make GNOME rock!

James Maguire at Datamation published an article late last year about the favourite projects of FLOSS industry and community leaders. Uh huh, I’m still catching up with 2007! :-)

With my GNOME Foundation hat on I thought that, rather than taking the easy way out by plugging a bunch of our rocking applications, it might be cool to show off some of the projects that make GNOME rock:

  • WordPress and WordPress MU (multi-user)

    Blogs and planet sites have had a huge impact on communication in the FLOSS world. GNOME and WordPress share many of the same philosophies about usability and development, so it’s not surprising that heaps of GNOME contributors use WordPress — and we’ve recently deployed WordPress MU on blogs.gnome.org. WordPress rocks.

  • Bugzilla

    Perpetually overlooked as one of the most important FLOSS apps, even though it is absolutely crucial to the development of so many: Mozilla, GNOME, Apache, Eclipse, OpenOffice.org… the list goes on — even NASA uses it! Bugzilla makes GNOME rock harder.

  • One Laptop Per Child

    Using GNOME technologies throughout, the OLPC project has created an amazing user interface for kids, and contributed some great technologies to the FLOSS world along the way — coming soon to GNOME! The best bit is that OLPC will take Software Freedom to millions, if not billions of kids around the world.

  • Cairo

    One of the classic ‘behind the scenes’ projects that has contributed to so many advances throughout the FLOSS world. It lies deep in the core of GNOME’s rendering technologies, not only delivering beautiful graphics, but a totally delicious API for software developers as well.

  • Evolution

    Okay, okay, I have to plug at least one GNOME application! Evo might not be the newest or sexiest GNOME app, but it is indispensible as one of our core communications tools, and its features help many users shift to FLOSS platforms – particularly in corporate environments. The next release will even have Google Calendar and Exchange MAPI support — sweet!

Check out the article for plenty of rocking Open Source projects suggested by other FLOSS industry and community folks.

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  1. I have not seen one corporate environment using Evolution. Probably never will. It doesn’t support well enough reserving meeting rooms and visually seeing who is available when you are trying to find a spot for meeting. Lack of S/Mime too (many whole countries have rolled out smartcards for citizens and companies already, using s/mime for signing and encryption). Where’s my kerberos authentication for the rest and auto-configurating? Why on earth should one distinct user have to configure their email client for the first time? Modern systems like Outlook+Exchange do not require that. Lower maintenance and support costs!

  2. I’m sorry Jeff. Unfortunately Exchange MAPI won’t make it to Evolution 2.22. The development schedule ends just after the GNOME release. But still the core dev work is a plugin. Which means GNOME 2.22 users can install the plugin and go ahead. (Sorry just updated the Roadmap too)

    To Answer troll: I can name a lot, but thay may be my company’s confidential information. But I can share atleast one name, who himself blogs at Planet GNOME City of Largo (Dave Richards) Evolution was supposed to have smart cards support for Exchange. But GAL thing was pending, so it was dropped out of schedule. If you still don’t believe OpenSUSE’s version of Evolution has smart-card support + GAL issue. I wanted to fix everything to add. Hey Btw, Evolution has PGP and S/Mime for encryption and signing and decrypting/signature verification. My be check the Composer’s Security menus.

  3. I use evolution with an exchange server now, and we don’t have IMAP installed on it. I always assumed that was MAPI? How does that work?

  4. Evolution… uhmm, when this one support fuly an FS/OS groupware server (Kontact in KDE Support egroupware, openxchange, zimbra, kolab, etc) i can think that Evo can be really the gnome app killer.