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John Howard, facing * defeat

You shouldn’t count your chickens before they’ve hatched, but you can definitely count your Google hits before election day.

We’re having what we’ve called an “election party/wake” next Saturday, but if the consistency of the polls over the last twelve months (and more recently) is anything to go by, there’ll be more chardonnay than tears at the Waugh household.

Howard and Costello

Here are some of the most popular adjectives used to describe what John Howard and the Liberal Party are facing on Saturday, linked to the search results that mention them (check my guide to Australian politics for Americans if you’re wondering why we’re toasting a “Liberal” defeat).

Regardless of all the polls, betting odds, embarrassing campaign screw-ups, flagging morale of conservative opinion writers and radio jocks, or nerdy enthusiasm of the progressive number-crunchers: Labor still has a fight on its hands.

It’s the last week of the campaign — when anything can happen — and the electoral statistics are no better now than when they were described as “impossible” six months ago.

Maybe I’ll wear black shoes, just in case.

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  1. At least Clinton did that stuff behind closed doors! (referring to the picture above)

    :)

    jdub here is your final warning! The Planet Blog police are coming!!! Don’t say I didn’t warn you :p

  2. Well, as a left-wing supporter considerably burned by the outcome of the 2006 Italian general election (unpopular right-wing government, public polls consistently awarding a 52+% majority to the opposition until the day of the elections, exit-polls reporting a 52%-to-47% victory, and in the end we won for 24 thousands votes on some 38 millions casted), my best wishes but prepare for everything.

  3. The advantage for me if Labor wins, of course, is cheap university, a free laptop (Thinkpad with Ubuntu for me, please), Faster Internet (pr0n at 100mbits/sec? Yes please!) and a Prime Minister named Kev.

    Of course, they are bound to do something awfully silly like reducing places in medical school, but what can you do…;)

  4. Unlike Americans I thought us Australians were less vocal about who we support in regards to politics, maybe because of our stereotypical laid back attitude towards everything (other than sport).

    It unusual to see someone so political open, refreshing almost, yet I hope it isn’t the beginning of a trend.

    I’m not surprised by your political opinion Jeff, especially your involvement with open source software, the values of the Labor party match well with the open source community.

    Oh, I think it is going to be a lot closer than the polls are saying, but I’m still tipping a Labor win (by 3 seats max)

  5. The polls had me a little worried, given how wildly different some of them were. The actual results (http://www.abc.net.au/elections/federal/2007) gave me much cause for celebration, and I’m very very keen to see which seats are now marginal.

    Next step – convincing the ALP govt that Open Document Formats are a really good thing which they should mandate. Goes hand in hand with their apparent commitment to true Freedom of Information!